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The Libyan Sibyl

By Keisha Mitchell

“The Libyan Sibyl”(produced in 1860 and finished in 1861) By William Wetmore Story is a life-size moving white marble sculpture (measured at approximately 5x4 feet) that alludes to the Greek myth of the earliest prophetess known to Greek civilization, The sibyl Pheromone, daughter of Zeus and The cursed Libyan Queen Lamia.  Created in 1861 and unique not only in theme, and composition, “The Libyan Sibyl” is a stirring piece because Story chose to use the subject matter of a psychic to convey what was at that time (and many would argue even still) the uncertain future of the American Black.  Story understood the significance of the social and political upheaval surrounding the Civil war which at the time the sculpture was begun, had just started. When “The Libyan Sibyl” premiered at the Universal Exposition in London, England in 1863, it was met with great reverence and respect. The piece was premiered alongside Storys’ prior crowd favorite Cleopatra, yet was still deemed the most impressive unanimously, and consequently, was used as a beacon of awareness for the struggle for freedom being fought abroad.   Although he was stationed from Rome during conception and creation of the piece, Storys’ sculpture had international impact while giving the world a provocative taste of the African form and history in fine art, a credit to which Story himself believed to be his “masterpiece”.     According to legend, Pheromone was born of the Greek God Zeus and North African Queen of Libya. As typical with many mythological characters in the Greek lexicon, The Queen Lamia was not just a human queen, rather in some versions, the personification of the northern half of the African continent itself. This is very important when contextualizing the creation of “The Libyan Sibyl”.  According to famed Uncle Tom novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Wetmore Story was heavily inspired by the life of abolitionist and suffragette, Sojourner Truth. While Story had no other history of activism or social commentary through his work to date, he sought the opportunity to contribute some interpretation to the conflict in encapsulating what he felt to be the strength of Sojourner Truth and all of those fighting for freedom in his American homeland with a very real inquiring “look” into the future of African-Americans domestically. Technically speaking, Story is correct in his assertion that the “The Libyan Sibyl” is his masterpiece, It is in this sculpture that we see a perfect crux between the tension of anticipated motion, and the solidarity of the still figure.  It is almost cheating on Storys’ behalf, because when the viewer first arrives in the Sibyls presence, she is sitting as if she has just sat down, toes slightly flexed implying recent contact with the ground, one foot slightly pigeon-toed as if she may have been seated in haste, folds of fabric seemingly freshly creased from just crossing her legs, body lunged in a semi-forward facing position as if she may be on the brink of utterance. Story uniquely approached contrapposto and Hellenistic classicism with the realism and practicality of the Romans, and those pioneers of the Renaissance.

           One thing that can be readily deciphered about Storys’ sculpture on sight however, is the fact that she is not “White” as many of the classical literary interpretations cast in the marble medium are. Though she is craft from white marble, the plaits and soft full wavy ripples of hair that sit underneath her headdress are distinctively different than the Mediterranean curls or straight hair generally found on such a figure. One also notices that “The Libyan Sibyl” is physically slightly larger than Storys’ other female sculptures, as well as barely clad in a simple sheet to protect her modesty (both are references to what Story saw as plausible elements in crafting the African likeness in sculpture. Story intended to show the world the strength and regality in the African form, and offer the black race an idealized symbolic champion that knew their future and held their secrets close.  In a letter to his friend, Charles Eliot Norton in August of 1861, Story wrote of his pleasure with his creation and told of his intent;                                   This last winter I finished what I consider to be my best work –it is so considered by all I believe, -the Libyan Sibyl. I have taken thepure Coptic head and figure, the great massive sphinx –like face, full lipped, long eyed, low browed, and lowering, and the large developed limbs of the African. She sits on a rock, her legs crossed, leaning forward, her elbow on her knee and her chin pressed down upon her hand. The upper part of the figure is nude and a rather simple mantle around her legs. This gave me a grand opportunity for the contrast of the masses of the nude with drapery, and I studied the nude with great care. It is a very massive figure, big-shouldered, large bosomed, with nothing of Venus in it, but as far as I could make it, luxurious and heroic.  She is looking out of her large Black eyes into futurity and sees the fate of her race. This is the theme of the figure-Slavery on the horizon, and I made her head as melancholy and severe as possible, not at all shrinking the African type. On the contrary, it is thoroughly African –Libyan African, not Congo.” Holding a “feather for divination” in her right hand, and her legs crossed, The Sibyl (whom was not only the first Grecian psychic but believed so sacred that her soul was said to be the face on the moon, and even the soil under which she was buried thereafter produced plants that aided in prophecy) gives off the otherworldliness of a individual caught between present and future. She stares off into space, head held in hand as if she herself doesn’t really know what to make of whatever lies before her. As a piece of social commentary, and neo-classical art “The Libyan Sibyl” is invaluable and truly flawless.  The ability of the Sibyl to see into her races future and the woe that visibly weighs her down with is breathtaking. The hunch of her shoulder is echoed in the millions of backs that she has to be witnessing break under the oppression of supremacy and misguidance, and the look on her face is unresolved because no one is privy to the knowledge of how that story ends. This work of art both moves me and sobers me as I took gaze of the Sibyl, trying to ascertain specifics of where my people are headed. There is something pungent in the energy of the piece, and it makes me feel very near to what “The Libyan Sibyl” appears to feel. Story executed his message very well and with great insight. I would gladly view this work of art again, as it continues to offer us a piece of history and provocation. “The Libyan Sibyl” is a stirring, masterfully crafted piece because of the use of its classical form and artistic austerity juxtaposed against its’ haunting reference to the plight and future of the African in the United States.

 

 

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It’s Dark & Earth is Hot

By Ok Kai/www.40acreasandacubicle.com

Climate change is real; at least partially attributable to human affect through carbon emissions and man made environmental changes etc.

That’s about as close to fact as we can get without the Earth (or God, or whatever) opening up and telling us Herself. Sure, there remains a tiny sliver of scientific doubt as to if emissions cause climate change, but there also exist tiny slivers of doubt as to whether gravity exists or if you’ll phase through your walls next time you switch the lights on. Whatever real “doubt” there is as to our role is mostly manufactured by politicians and businesses that have a financial interest in maintaining the status quo. Deal with it. If you don’t believe in our role in climate change, perhaps it’s time to find an old wooden wardrobe and go off cavorting with Mr. Tummus. Please do so now before you waste your life reading anymore of my words.

Now, to really begin. Climate change and its effects are important to me from a personal perspective, as you may be able to tell from the above paragraph. Many in my family still farm, and for decades many have depended directly on the weather to survive. I grew up knowing intimately the consequences of drought or too much rain and I still nod my head and smile when I “smell rain” after a long dry spell. Hurricanes regularly ravage my state,and my small North Carolina town was completely flooded and much of it destroyed when Hurricane Floyd passed through in the wake of flooding from Hurricane Dennis in 1999. Fifteen years later there are people that I know still living in crumbling FEMA-rented trailers in the ruins of small towns destroyed  by the flooding and drinking well water contaminated by those floods.

It is this personal perspective that informs both my social and political perspectives. In the wake of the Obama administration and the EPA’s series of proposed rules limiting emissions from power plants in what would sadly amount to our largest salvo against climate change to date, the American public still has a perspective that is stubbornly disconnected from the potential realities of a hotter planet. While most do favor certain laws like these, the true threats of climate change are seen by most individuals and businesses as diffuse risks without ascertainable or “real” effects beyond a few turns on the thermostat. By and large, the populations of the developed world have not had the perspective to grasp that climate change represents perhaps the most striking threat to social justice and equality of our time. It represents a looming apocalypse of sorts, complete with the cavalier tetrad of Famine, Pestilence, War,  Death, and for many on the margins of society, the apocalypse has already come.

Enter New Orleans, where Katrina caused nearly 2,000 (recorded) deaths in 2005 and caused further waves of disease, violence, displacement, family trauma, and property damage that reverberated across the entire American South as thousands were driven away from their homes. Since then, the areas with the most bounce back have obviously been mostly White, wealthier areas that weren’t hit as hard to begin with and where people had greater agency to escape when conditions got out of hand. Look at New York and New Jersey, at a glance it would seem like the region has been resilient and bounced back well, it’s clear upon closer inspection that the effects were much more severe for poor folks and minorities, with many facing permanent displacement.

Even worse, many poor folks and minorities were discriminated against in receiving recovery aid, because we all know that racism is best served as a side dish to catastrophe.

While it’s important to note that Katrina and Sandy were not definitively caused or made worse by rising global temperatures, we do know that they serve as definite examples of what WILL happen if we blow past the two-degree Celsius “speed limit” under which we can avoid most catastrophic global changes. In addition to hurricanes and coastal plain flooding, we can expect massive droughts, desertification and accompanying famines; desalination and acidification of marine waters and accompanying seafood-related famines; river expansion and delta flooding; groundwater contamination; forest fires; increase in insect-borne and tropical diseases (like sleeping sickness and malaria); and mass extinctions, possibly including our own. That’s the abridged version.

These issues all would mostly affect the global poor and those on the literal and figurative margins of society first. Famine will obviously impact the poor first, as most will be priced out of food markets and left to starve. Many poor small farmers that live and die at the whims of the rains will also either be displaced or will starve. Destruction of freshwater sources will affect the poor most as well, as they already face structural water shortages and won’t be able to pay to import clean water. Death and disease will follow, as disease often follows populations resorting to unclean water. Insect borne-diseases always affect the poor more than anyone else (although there are some genetic saving graces to malaria). Those without the means, knowledge, or agency to escape approaching waters, winds, fires, or deserts will become dispossessed or killed, and bands of starved climate change-related refugees dealing with death and disease will encounter lawlessness and violence as they struggle with people living in fairer lands for remaining resources. What we have is a perfect recipe for those Four Horsemen to rear their ugly heads among the marginalized populations of the world.

Just in case I haven’t quite driven home the points I sought out to address on a global level, the below map courtesy of Vox shows the global risks of climate change by country. The world’s largest historical contributors to our state of fucked-ness (mostly North America and Europe) are also those least vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Many countries that have just begun the process of industrialization are at the highest risk of famine, rising sea levels, acute disasters, and desertification. And they have already begun seeing the harbingers-the pioneer disasters. they have already begun seeing the harbingers-the pioneer disasters. The Philippines and Coastal India suffered two of the most powerful storms in recorded history in 2013, displacing millions. After the worst drought in human history in the late 20th century, the Sahel region in North-Central Africa has recently alternated between periods of inhabitable downpours and droughts, and may have been permanently altered into an emerging desert.

These broad country-level effects of climate change interact with regional and local effects of zoning and population/wealth clustering to form a brand new axis of privilege. Instead of socioeconomic status, I posit a new way of thing about this: socio-climatic status.

The takeaway from this is not the typical response of the belief that this is some unhappy geopolitical accident by which the rich and the White power structures (and local dominant ethnic groups in some areas) unwittingly screwed everyone else. This is a long, purposeful and ongoing effort at saddling marginalized folks with the costs of bad business. We’ve known about climate change for two decades now, and while it’s charming to believe that we’ve just been lovably slow learners to an inconvenient truth, the fact is that many ideologues and businesses that they protected from the start crafted messages to defend current business practices with the full knowledge of the effects. The three religions of our power structure, Capitalism, Patriarchy, and Christianity all acted in concert to pull off one of the greatest swindles in history and have placed us in a spot where it may be too late to actually do anything. Belief in anything other than willful and purposeful denial of climate change for decades is either naivete or complicity. The social injustice of our time has already been perpetrated.

   Know that this is an endgame. Geographic disparities, area planning and disaster management/planning have long placed vulnerable populations in vulnerable areas. Attempts at colonization and war have long cordoned vulnerable populations into vulnerable areas and have eroded natural defenses against disasters. Overdevelopment, pollution, and overutilization of vulnerable areas have made them more vulnerable. This has been done with knowledge of what’s to come. “Climate change doesn’t exist” is just a dangerous phrase as “Racism doesn’t exist.”

Namaste.

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Southern Playas: Breaking Hollowed Ground

By Keisha Mitchell

South Carolina import Messiah Da Rapper and Georgia native Clay James are no strangers to hard work. Just four years ago the two met and teamed up together to champion the Souths’ return as the home of lyricism served with a side

 of finesse. In the short time since their beginning they have created Southern Playas, a 2 man collective that serves as a platform for both their sound aesthetic, and their mystique, as well as Southern Playa records.  While it is important to note the two are not a group, their experiences and differences afford the two a balance that is as interesting as it is refreshing. In the words of member Clay James “We’re individual artist but we got the same objective and the objective is to bring the South back to where it used to be as far as musically.” With influences that range from Will Smith, to Mystikal Southern Playas have an awareness of the diversity to be found within hiphop, alongside a deep appreciation for their southern rap roots. This comprehension shines through on songs such as “Runna”  (produced by M-16) where Messiah Da Rappers’ (the self-proclaimed Renaissance man and Sex-symbol of the duo) smooth delivery and mature presence on the track are offset and matched by Clay James’ energy and mastery of the beat. 

 Clay James’ mixtape “Country and Proud” which was released in May of 2014 has been gaining much attention and boasts industry production and solid singles. The mixtape (which was actually derived from a song bearing the same name) showcases James’ lyrical capacity alongside features from Messiah (whose solo project is set to release in August under the title “Curious”) and is a good hint of what listeners can expect on the formal Southern Playas project set to be released August 1st.

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Reel Love: Days Of Future Past

By David Rozzel: www.thecolorchannel.tumblr.com

The 2014 media spectacle, X-Men: Days of Future Past, delivers all that the commercials promise – big hits, loud bangs, and an almost perfect sphere of clever wit and creative storytelling.  Director, Bryan Singer makes way for a viscous menagerie of mutants to tell their tales as to how the world became so harsh for them.

This, the seventh installment of Singer-directed X-Men films, begins with a jarring picture of the future. This trite image, complete with an enslaved populous of zombie slaves is actually a misleading set up for a chronologically non-linear nickelodeon explaining the rich lineage of X Men past and present.

It begins with Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) strapped to a table, priming his senses for a trip back in time, via Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page).  He wakes up in the seventies surrounding by a gaggle of thugs.  Before long, Wolverine kills the greasy triplets, takes the biggest one’s keys, and heads to the X-Mansion

Similar to Avengers, the all-time highest grossing movie, Days of the Future Past includes every mutant imaginable (even Johnny Flame…explain that).  From Halle Berry returning as Storm to  Anna Paquin resumingher role as Rouge, this film is truly a geek’s wet dream.  How does Singer bring it all together? The answer to this is simple – by connecting Nixon’s War on Drugs with the presence of mutants.

Peter Dinklage, of Game of Thrones fame, plays a dastardly villain, dead-set on weapon-izing the mutant gene to make a deal with world leaders leery of the mutant threat.  A particularly potent moment in the film involves a pulp mini-episode in which Wolverine, now reunited with a young Charles Xavier, storms the top-secret bad guy convention.  Magneto and Mystique’s torrid love affair becomes the central story upon which the wild ballyhoo flourishes.  Keep in mind this is the seventies. Professor X (Patrick Stewart) does an outstanding job of staying out of Jackman’s way.  James McAvoy gives an eerie yet suitable life to Professor X’s younger self.  His clever portrayal of Xavier steals every scene he’s in.  Michael Fassbender, the young Magneto, bounces well off of McAvoy’s glassy-eyed cynicism with stern, vengeance-fueled virility.  Jennifer Lawrence sort of flounders as Mystique, perhaps the one mistake made in casting.  The hardest part is keeping up with the mutant’s names (and in Raven’s case, the makeup). 

While I would like to say that Days of Future Past is a testament to great filmmaking, it exists among the ranks of visually stunning blockbusters that the millennials have come to love.  These films excite the eye, but do little for the mind.  I must admit, however, that it is at the high end of the continuum, if one indeed exists.  In the words of Beast, “this creature is amazing.”  There is a lot of full frontal face time, so I would suggest seeing this film in 3-D.  Good flick. 

       Two eyes open.  Peace

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How Dare You Call Me a Racist?

By OK Kai/www.40acresandacubicle.com 

There aren’t many words in the English language that can incite as much pain and hate as the word ”nigger.

  Almost every racial and ethnic group has a disparaging and offensive slur associated with them, but nigger  is easily the most notorious. The majority of White people in the United States called Black people niggers when slavery was cool. It was just the thing to do, build a nation on the backs of beautifully dark people and lump them into one category of niggers. Some Europeans were using the term without deliberate insult, they used the n-word to refer to all Africans. Kind of like how people still compare Africa to other countries as if all of the countries in Africa are the same, it’s identity-stripping behavior. When slavery was abolished, racist white folk started using the term solely as a tool of division and oppression. Then Black people took the word and told White people they couldn’t use it anymore.

         But the post-racial society slaps us with a hand-full of irony. The most offensive thing you can call a white person these days is a racist. Calling a white person racist elicits a reaction liken to that of an ugly fat person getting called “an ugly fat person” to their face. Its not quite at nigger-level, but it’s pretty damn offensive.

         When I was moving from my old house, the landlord, Jennifer,  talked to me about the new resident of the property. The landlord was White and the tenant was a young Black woman with a mom who made a lot of demands. She demanded yard service, new paint, a new stove and a new sink, even though her daughter had signed the lease weeks prior and thought everything was great. Jennifer pretty much made it sound like this woman had gene markers from of Mo’Nique, Angela Bassett and Mama Jones because she apparently made these demands with copious amounts of sass. Jennifer went on to say that the tenant’s mom called her, “a racist bigot trying to squeeze these niggers out of their money”. As she explained that her husband is Black, tears began to roll down her cheek. I’m not that close to my landlord, so I was admittedly uncomfortable. But I still tried to comfort her by saying, “that’s terrible” and patting her on the shoulder.  I felt bad, but not that bad. I mean, mom got called a nigger bitch at a tennis club and didn’t shed a tear. Just saying.

My landlord, as emotional as she may have been, had seemingly solid grounds for her reaction. It makes sense to take offense to people calling you something that you are not. However, if the shoe fits, shut up and take the criticism.

         Decades ago, white people in the United States could defend ignorant behavior by calling it the norm, god’s will, or the will of the state. Now, however, being openly racist is looked down upon. You usually can’t put KKK down on your resume. Since being overtly racist is no longer socially acceptable, racist behavior is defended with projection.

For example, my white friend locked the door when we were sitting in the car waiting for a Chinese food order and some Black guys walked by. I told him that that was some racist shit, to which he replied, “You’re racist for thinking that bro”.

            People  had been walking passed our car for ten minutes. I called his bluff and told him that his strategy wasn’t original.  Ever since racism became uncool, White America has been scrambling, trying to find ways to dissociate from bigotry. The most popular strategy for the especially ignorant has been to accuse the group that would most likely take offense. When George Zimmerman shot Trayvon Martin, 24-hour news channels were immensely fixated on Zimmerman’s race. They wanted us to know that Zimmerman was part Hispanic so bad that people who were defending him talked about his heritage more than his character.              They hardly cared if this was the type of guy that would chase a teenager down the street and kill him for no rational reason, we just needed to know that he wasn’t racist. Then some of Zimmerman’s supporters tried to suggest that Black people were trying to capitalize on tragedies to promote their agenda. Republican politicians then said that Obama was being divisive when he said that his son would look like Trayvon.

When I was at the club a few weeks ago, the crew and I had found the perfect section to chill and go hammer at will.  It was a mixed crowd, so there were some white people dancing near us. Everything was cool until Down 4 My Niggaz came on. My crew continued to bob there heads and drink their drinks. The white people proceeded to get krunk and yell “FUCK THEM OTHER NIGGAS ‘CAUSE I’M DOWN FOR MY NIGGAS!” at the top of their lungs. We didn’t react at first, we’ve lived in Post-Racial America for a while now. Our tolerance began to dwindle as the white girls relentlessly bumped into my crew despite several requests for them to “chill”. One of my homegirls mushed one of the racial slurring white girls in the face. As the men of the respective crews jumped between them, my homegirl called the white chic a racist. The white girl wasn’t even trying to get into it at first, until she was accused of being racist. Then she turned around and yelled “I am NOT a racist! You’re a racist!” and started towards us with red in her eyes.

I contemplated letting the brawl go down, but we continued to form a blockade around the section like a drunken game of red rover until the leader of the white crew was like, “we gotta go”.White people hate being called racist.  This is the time of a Black president, hip-hop influence and Scandal with Kerry Washington, surely racism is a thing of the past. Just like the Caucasian imperialism that exploited damn near every region of darker hue on this planet is a thing of the past, right? Many white people think that the word “racism” only applies to overtly violent or oppressive acts. So if they’re not calling Black people racial slurs, lynching Black men or barring Black citizens from patronizing public establishments, they’re not racist. From the public education system, to the justice system, from our microsystems to our exosystems, there is racism everywhere.  I understand why white people don’t want to be affiliated with such negative images and connotations. It’s  similar to how Black people hate being stereotyped. If you claim to be tolerant or impartial to race, then recognize racist behavior when you see it. Everyone holds prejudices of some kind, and we should all be trying to reduce them. That requires honesty with yourself. Trying to ignore racism, or project it onto others in your denial, is the most hindering thing you can do to your personal development.  Increase your introspective moments and adjust your behavior, I’m tired seeing the pot call the kettle nigger.

My apologies to the NAACP.

1love.

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Letters From The Editor: To reality Tvs’ Black Women

To the Deelishises, Boots, and Buckys (Flavor of Love); The Omorosas (The Apprentice), Corals(The Real World), and Taneishas (Bad Girl’s Club);The Atlanta “housewives” (Bravo), Basketball “Wives (VH1), and girlfriends, jump-offs, baby mommas or whatever other term given to the loosely delineated relationships of VH1’s Love and Hip hop Atlanta:

I have no doubt your affiliation with the aforementioned programming has not only significantly increased the value of your bank accounts, but has also garnered notable increases in viewership for your host channels, as well as revenue for producers and writers. It may even be stated that your participation in these shows has extended your five minutes of fame into fifteen in a world where it takes only seconds of exposure to achieve fame or become forgotten. Yet, in light of all your gain from the successes of your small screen performances (assuming that endless club appearances, mediocre product lines, countless promotional photo shoots with no particular sponsors and or profits, and casting calls and careers that amount in inevitably more reality television is considered a success), one must ask what cost you paid with respect to your dignity?

          Now, my intent is not to ‘”judge” (that’s not my forte, or my interest). I’m simply inquiring if – after you auditioned for the season, signed the release forms, acted an ass on camera, and left your likeness and reputation to the whim of the editors in pursuit of fame and funds – you ever once considered the almost irrevocable effect you would have on the large-scale perception of Black women, and more importantly, the minds of black girls and young women set to one day become Black women themselves?

         The stereotype of black women perpetuated by  Western media and incubated by American culture (i.e. Black women as the welfare bound, domineering, ignorant, sexually immoral, yet highly religious, government freeloader) used to be an archetype found only in the characters written and endorsed by white writers and fed to the community by those who did not know us. In the era of television where the sitcom, rather than the reality television show, ruled (circa 1970-1998), there were a plethora of series dedicated to showcasing the progressive side of the African American experience. Many shows boasted characters that were not only indicative of real people in our lives (i.e. Moesha (1996) and Roc (1991)), but housed content that was relevant, provoking, and heartfelt.

Then somewhere around 1999, perhaps inspired by Y2k and the impending doom of the new millennium, a new genre was created where people did nothing but be themselves.

         Enter MTV’s iconic “The Real World” (which had actually premiered successfully in 1992, but gained popular acclaim during the early 2000s) and CBS’s “Big Brother”which debuted in 2000 with a premise about nothing other than people aware of the fact they were being watched and the dynamics that ensued thereafter. These shows capitalized on their reality TV platform but also on their social experiment composition, similar to George Orwell’s “1984”. Soon, every genre of television possible was converted into “reality” while the casts and circumstances became more and more scripted, and the finished products less discreet about it. 

          That last paragraph probably meant nothing to you. I just figured you might like to know your place historically in all this mess. From a Black woman to Black women – whom I know with the greatest conviction have feelings, hopes, and aspirations like we all do – any endorsement of our presumed inferiority; footage of lewd, reckless, violent, or just plain ignorant behavior; petty arguments; admission of shallow aspirations and motivations fueled by money and men’s status; and no real contribution to the overall environment other than the hate and gossip you monger about those around you is an outright obstacle, and an act of sabotage to the advancement of ethnic women the world over.  That might be an understatement.

I am consistently disenchanted by the portrayal of Black women as angry, raging bulls (acted so convincingly by characters like “Bad Girls’ Clubs’” Taneisha, or Coral from “Real World New York”). I’m thoroughly disgusted by caricatures of Black women as mindless, crazy, status obsessed sex objects (see: the casts of “Flavor of Love” and “Love and Hip Hop Atlanta”). I am intensely incensed at violence depicted as the primary method of communication between us on “Basketball Wives”.

WE deserve to be represented and written better. After centuries of oppression, victimization, and marginalization, we deserve to be shown in a light as wide and well rounded as the fake asses and titties found on the leading ladies of these programs.  Am I going too far to wager that you’re still somehow unfulfilled emotionally and spiritually every week at the end of each episode?

         I am reminded of a time when there was honor amongst women, and genteelness and couth were desired attributes in the feminine. What happened to the art of being a lady? When did we learn to no longer covet its mystique?

I am disappointed in you ladies heralding further fragmentation of our little girls’ social skills and identity. I am most disappointed in other media outlets like VIBE magazine calling women like Ms. Lozada a “new role model” in the Black community. Quite frankly, if that’s the new role model, than we need to return to the old immediately.

         In closing, to the Black women of Reality TV and hopefuls wishing to one day sit in their confessionals: I am praying for you as I am praying for all of us in these times of deception and dishonesty. Though your lies may be lucrative, I pray for the day when you no longer seek these reality series, or producers who sponsor our crucifixions seasonally, for fame, success, or wealth. I pray that you learn to consider success as the contributions you give to your communities and your children, your feelings of fame from the fact that you are loved and valuable, and your measure of wealth from good health and good constitution of your hearts and minds.

On that note, be blessed. And next time your shows are on, look at the screen and then look in the mirror and try to remember which your true reflection is.

Selah,

The Editor-In-Chief

K!M.

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